PDF- Andrew Young School of Policy -Early Care and Education Industry - Bright from the Start - ADNREW YOUNG SCHOOL OF POLICY STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT AND POLICY. PMAP 8261 NONPROFIT FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Fall 2015

YOUNG SCHOOL OF POLICY STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT AND POLICY.

PMAP 8261 NONPROFIT FINANCIAL...

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ADNREW YOUNG SCHOOL OF POLICY STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT AND POLICY PMAP 8261 NONPROFIT FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Fall 2015 Instructor: Ross Rubenstein Office: Andrew Young School,

Room 335 Office Phone: 404-413-0109 E-mail: [email protected]

Class Time: Monday 7:15-9:45 Class Location: Langdale Hall 318 Office Hours: Monday 3-4 or by appointment

NOTE: I am flexible regarding appointments,

but please call or e-mail ahead COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of this course you should be able to:  Apply accounting principles,

and concepts  Read and analyze financial statements  Demonstrate how accounting and other financial information is used in management  Understand fundamental concepts and methods of finance and financial analysis  Analyze contemporary financial management issues relevant to nonprofits  Apply financial management knowledge and tools to assist in the management of personal financial affairs TARGET AUDIENCE: This course is designed for students who have no previous formal training (or equivalent on-the-job experience) in either business,

nonprofit or government accounting or finance.

If you have such training or experience,

you probably should not be enrolled in this course.

COURSE OVERVIEW: The first portion of the course focuses on financial decision-making techniques,

often referred to as managerial accounting.

This section includes short and long-term financial decision-making,

managing resources and controlling the financial plan.

The second portion of the course focuses on financial accounting.

This material covers the development of financial statements,

and the use of financial statements to analyze a nonprofit’s financial condition.

The focus of this section is to help you use financial statements to understand the financial health of an organization and communicate this information to others.

This is a survey course.

Much of the subject matter is technical and a single course will not make you an expert in financial management.

However,

mastery of the course material should be advantageous to anyone who is aiming for a position as a financial analyst or a front-line manager with budgetary responsibility.

As an extra benefit,

several of the course topics may be of value in managing your personal finances.

CAVEAT EMPTOR: This course is numbers-oriented.

Although you don’t have to be a math whiz,

the course involves a considerable amount of number crunching and analysis of financial information.

You will have to use a calculator in class and on exams and Excel in some homework assignments.

Some assignments will require you to describe what your numerical analysis means in plain language.

PMAP 8261 Fall 15

TEXTS,

ADDITIONAL READINGS,

and CALCULATOR Required Text (Available at the GSU Bookstore or online) Steven A.

Finkler,

Financial Management for Public,

Health,

and Not-for-Profit Organizations,

Prentice-Hall,

2012.

All additional readings and case studies will be posted on Brightspace.

Calculator You will need a calculator that will do time value of money calculations.

Such calculators are sometimes referred to as financial calculators.

I recommend that you purchase either a Texas Instruments BA-35 Solar calculator or Texas Instruments BAII-Plus Business Analyst calculator if you don’t own a calculator that does time value of money calculations.

I can provide assistance as you learn how to use it for in-class exercises,

You are free to buy another brand but you will be on your own in learning how to operate it.

If you do not wish to purchase a calculator,

you may use a financial calculator app for a phone or tablet.

These programs generally work in the same way as the financial calculator but you will be responsible for ensuring that you can use them correctly.

There is also a BAII Plus app available for iPhones and iPads.

I strongly recommend that you use the calculator or app for practice problems before taking the midterm exam to ensure that you know how to use them.

Also,

please see note about apps under academic honesty below.

COURSE FORMAT: Most class sessions will focus on conceptual and analytical material contained in an assigned reading.

You will be expected to have read the assigned material and to have made a good faith effort to complete all written assignments.

I will sometimes lecture about the assigned material and about related topics not covered in the text.

At other times I will lead a discussion about the assignment in which class members will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of the material and to explain their solutions to assigned problems and their analyses of assigned cases.

The text also contains descriptive material that may not be discussed in class.

You are responsible for that material.

ATTENDANCE: You are expected to attend all class meetings and to come to class prepared to discuss the day's assignment.

Notably poor participation or lack of preparation may result in a lower course grade.

Please arrive before class begins and stay until it has concluded.

PROTOCOL: 1.

Class begins promptly at 7:15 PM and continues until 9:45.

We will typically take a short break about halfway through.

Please arrive on time.

If you have a cell phone,

watch with alarm or other distracting noisemaking devices,

please be certain they are turned off during class.

I prefer that you do not use a laptop or tablet in class.

You may use it in class if necessary,

Please do not use it to surf the Internet,

or engage in other non-class related activities (the same goes for smartphones

It is very distracting to me and may be distracting to your classmates.

PMAP 8261 Fall 15

Your constructive assessment of this course plays an indispensable role in shaping education at Georgia State.

Upon completing the course,

please take time to fill out the online course evaluation GRADING Class participation and attendance: 5% of grade.

Three written exercises: combined total,

Financial Condition Analysis: 20% of grade Midterm examination: 30% of grade.

Final examination: 30% of grade.

Discretion in grading may be exercised in cases where the professor believes appropriate.

WRITTEN EXERCISES There will be three short written exercises.

Each exercise is to be typed and is due at the beginning of class on the designated date.

Late assignments will not be accepted.

Each will count 5% toward your course grade.

You will receive each exercise at least one week before the due date.

They will be in the nature of a problem or case that will require application of technical material,

Computer crashes,

or other technical problems will not be accepted as reasons for late delivery of assignments,

so please do not delay your preparation until the last moment.

FINANCIAL CONDITION ANALYSIS The final assignment,

to be completed with a group of three to four classmates,

is a financial condition analysis of a nonprofit organization.

Your group should choose an organization as early as possible in the semester so that you can obtain its audited financial statements,

Your group will turn in one paper and each member of your group will receive the same grade.

You may choose virtually any nonprofit organization based in the United States for this assignment.

I recommend against choosing a foundation or other organization that primarily provides grants to other organizations.

If you have any questions about the suitability of your government,

please provide me with a copy of the financial statements and I will let you know.

You must obtain a copy of the most recent audited financial statements and submit a copy of the statements with your assignment (electronic copies or links to a website with the statements are fine).

You may also obtain other documents (previous statements,

etc.) but this is not required and you do not need to submit these materials.

The final written analysis should be no more than 12 pages long (double spaced),

not counting tables or other supplementary materials.

You will present a summary of your findings in class on December 7 and your final paper is due by 5 pm December 11.

EXAMINATIONS:  Each of the exams will be an in-class exam.

 There will not be a makeup date for either the midterm or the final examination.

 There will be no extra exams or other forms of extra credit assignments to raise your course grade.

PMAP 8261 Fall 15

END-OF-CHAPTER EXERCISES The Finkler text includes a number of useful problems at the end of each chapter.

Suggested problems are listed for each topic.

These problem sets are not required and you do not have to hand in solutions.

I strongly recommend that you complete the problems.

We will go over some of them in class (as time permits) and I will post solutions.

These problems are the best preparation for the exams and other written assignments.

OFFICE HOURS,

E-MAIL AND CONSULTING WITH INSTRUCTOR You are always welcome to take your chances and come by at any time to see me.

I will be pleased to meet with you on a "drop in" basis whenever I am there and not otherwise occupied.

I prefer,

that you set up an appointment ahead of time – this will also save you from a wasted trip if I’m not available.

You are also encouraged to use e-mail to contact me when you have questions about assignments and would like to have an answer before the next class meeting.

I will check my e-mail regularly and make every effort to answer your questions as quickly as possible.

ACADEMIC HONESTY The University’s policy on academic honesty states that “As members of the academic community,

students are expected to recognize and uphold standards of intellectual and academic integrity.

The university assumes as a basic and minimum standard of conduct in academic matters that students be honest and that they submit for credit only the products of their own efforts.

Both the ideals of scholarship and the need for fairness require that all dishonest work be rejected as a basis for academic credit.

They also require that students refrain from any and all forms of dishonorable or unethical conduct related to their academic work.” The full policy on academic honesty can be found in Section 409 of the Faculty Handbook or at: http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwfhb/sec409.html.

All students are responsible for understanding expectations and requirements for academic honesty.

Any instance of academic dishonesty will result in a grade of F and could result in expulsion from the Andrew Young School.

If you are ever in doubt about expectations for academic honesty,

please do not hesitate to ask the instructor

! DISABILITY SERVICES Students who wish to request accommodation for a disability may do so by registering with the Office of Disability Services.

Students may only be accommodated upon issuance by the Office of Disability Services of a signed Accommodation Plan and are responsible for providing a copy of that plan to instructors of all classes in which accommodations are sought.

COURSE OUTLINE,

SCHEDULE AND ASSIGNMENTS (Subject to revision) AUGUST 24

COURSE INTRODUCTION AND BUDGETING Reading: Finkler,

Preface and Chapters 1 – 3,

including Appendices Complete: Finkler problems 2-20,

2-22,

2-24,

2-29,

PMAP 8261 Fall 15

AUGUST 31

BUDGETING (continued)

COST ANALYSIS Case: The Theater Budget Finkler,

Chapter 4 Complete: Finkler problems 3-23,

3-26,

Chapter 4: 4-30 through 4-39,

4-47,

4-51,

SEPTEMBER 7

LABOR DAY: NO CLASS

SEPTEMBER 14

TIME VALUE OF MONEY AND CAPITAL BUDGETING Reading: Finkler,

Chapter 5 (including Appendix 5-A and 5-B) Complete: Finkler,

Problems 5-11 through 5-19,

For Excel,

it is not necessary to write the spreadsheet formula or cell references)

SEPTEMBER 21

CAPITAL BUDGETING AND INVESTMENT ANALYSIS Reading: Finkler Chapter 6.

TDC “The Risk of Debt in Financing Nonprofit Facilities”

Davis,

“Nonprofit Corporations: Borrowing with TaxExempt Bonds” Complete: Finkler,

Problems 6-6 through 6-8,

ASSIGNMENT # 1 IS DUE: Orangetown United for Full Employment

SEPTEMBER 28

MANAGING SHORT-TERM RESOURCES Reading: Finkler,

Chapter 7

Barr and Bell “An Executive Director’s Guide to Financial Leadership” Complete: Finkler Problem 7-30,

OCTOBER 5

BUDGET EXECUTION AND INTERNAL CONTROLS Reading: Finkler,

Chapter 8 (pages 291-294 are optional)

Commonfund Institute,

“Ethics and the Nonprofit”

Gallagher and Radcliffe “Internal Controls in Nonprofit Organizations” Complete: Finkler Problems 8-24 through 8-29

OCTOBER 12

MIDTERM EXAMINATION

OCTOBER 19

INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING: GENERALLY ACCEPTED ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES AND THE STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION Reading: Finkler Chapter 10 (Appendices are optional) Complete: Finkler,

Problems 10-23 through 10-28

OCTOBER 26

THE ACTIVITY STATEMENT AND CASH FLOW STATEMENT Reading: Finkler,

Chapters 11 and 13,

Appendix 11-C (Other appendices are optional) Complete: Finkler,

Problems 11-14 through 11-17 (cash flow statement is optional)

PMAP 8261 Fall 15

NOVEMBER 2

UNIQUE ASPECTS OF NONPROFIT ACCOUNTING,

Appendix 12-A,

Case Study Individual Rehabilitation Services Complete: Finkler problems 12-17,

NOVEMBER 9

ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION Reading: Finkler,

Chapter 15 Complete: Finkler,

NOVEMBER 16

ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION (continued) Readings: Standard and Poor’s “Nonprofit Criteria: Non-Traditional Nonprofits” ASSIGNMENT # 3 IS DUE: Notes for Major Medical Center case (Finkler page 552)

NOVEMBER 23

NO CLASS – HAPPY THANKSIVING

NOVEMBER 30

LONG-TERM INVESTING: PENSIONS AND ENDOWMENTS Reading: Commonfund Institute “Principals of Nonprofit Investment Management”

Weikert,

al “Investment Strategies”

Zeitlow “Investing Principles and Procedures.”

DECEMBER 7

CLASS PRESENTATIONS FINAL EXAM: Monday December 14,

7:00-9:30

Note: The course syllabus provides a general plan for the course